This Day In History
This Day In History
Friday, October 19, 2018

«President of the United States»

Chester A Arthur

Chester A Arthur
(October 5, 1829 - November 18, 1886)
Chester Alan Arthur was the 21st President of the United States (1881–1885).
President of the United States

John F Kennedy

John F Kennedy
(May 29, 1917 - November 22, 1963)
John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy often referred to by his initials JFK, was the 35th President of the United States, serving from 1961 until his assassination in 1963.
President of the United States, Kennedy

Franklin Pierce

Franklin Pierce
(November 23, 1804 - October 8, 1869)
Franklin Pierce was the 14th President of the United States (1853-1857) and is the only President from New Hampshire. Pierce was a Democrat and a "doughface" (a Northerner with Southern sympathies) who served in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate. Pierce took part in the Mexican-American War and became a brigadier general in the Army.
President of the United States, Pierce

George Washington

George Washington
(February 22, 1732 - December 14, 1799)
George Washington was the dominant military and political leader of the new United States of America from 1775 to 1799. He led the American victory over Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army from 1775 to 1783, and presided over the writing of the Constitution in 1787. The unanimous choice to serve as the first President of the United States (1789–1797), Washington presided over the creation of a strong, well-financed national government that stayed neutral in the wars raging in Europe, suppressed rebellion and won acceptance among Americans of all types. His leadership style established many forms and rituals of government that have been used since, such as using a cabinet system and delivering an inaugural address. Washington is universally regarded as the "Father of his Country".
George Washington, President of the United States

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson
(December 28, 1856 - February 3, 1924)
Thomas Woodrow Wilson was the 28th President of the United States, from 1913 to 1921. A leader of the Progressive Movement, he served as President of Princeton University from 1902 to 1910, and then as the Governor of New Jersey from 1911 to 1913. Running against Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party candidate Theodore Roosevelt and Republican candidate William Howard Taft, Wilson was elected President as a Democrat in 1912.
President of the United States, Wilson

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt
(October 27, 1858 - January 6, 1919)
Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt was the 26th President of the United States (1901–1909). He is noted for his exuberant personality, range of interests and achievements, and his leadership of the Progressive Movement, as well as his "cowboy" persona and robust masculinity.
President of the United States, Roosevelt, Teddy

Millard Fillmore

Millard Fillmore
(January 7, 1800 - March 8, 1874)
Millard Fillmore was the 13th President of the United States (1850–1853) and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the office of president. As Zachary Taylor's Vice President, he assumed the presidency after Taylor's death.
President of the United States, Fillmore

Richard Nixon

Richard Nixon
(January 9, 1913 - April 22, 1994)
Richard Milhous Nixon was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. The only president to resign the office, Nixon had previously served as a US representative and senator from California and as the 36th Vice President of the United States from 1953 to 1961.
President of the United States, Nixon

John Tyler

John Tyler
(March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862)
John Tyler was the tenth President of the United States (1841–1845). A native of Virginia, Tyler served as a state legislator, governor, U.S. representative, and U.S. senator before being elected Vice President (1841).
President of the United States, Tyler

Lyndon B Johnson

Lyndon B Johnson
(August 27, 1908 - January 22, 1973)
Lyndon Baines Johnson, often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969), a position he assumed after his service as the 37th Vice President of the United States (1961–1963). He is one of only four people who served in all four elected federal offices of the United States: Representative, Senator, Vice President and President.
President of the United States, Johnson

William McKinley

William McKinley
(January 29, 1843 - September 14, 1901)
William McKinley, Jr. was the 25th President of the United States (1897–1901). He is best known for winning fiercely fought elections, while supporting the gold standard and high tariffs; he succeeded in forging a Republican coalition that for the most part dominated national politics until the 1930s. He also led the nation to victory in 100 days in the Spanish–American War.
President of the United States, McKinley

January 30, 1835

In the first assassination...
In the first assassination attempt against a President of the United States, Richard Lawrence attempts to shoot president Andrew Jackson, but fails and is subdued by a crowd, including several congressmen. On January 30, 1835, what is believed to be the first attempt to kill a sitting President of the United States occurred just outside the United States Capitol. When Jackson was leaving through the East Portico after the funeral of South Carolina Representative Warren R. Davis, Richard Lawrence, an unemployed housepainter from England, aimed a pistol at Jackson, which misfired. Lawrence pulled out a second pistol, which also misfired. Historians believe the humid weather contributed to the double misfiring. Lawrence was restrained, and legend says that Jackson attacked Lawrence with his cane. Others present, including David Crockett, restrained and disarmed Lawrence.
Jackson, assassination attempt, President of the United States

Franklin D Roosevelt

Franklin D Roosevelt
(January 30, 1882 - April 12, 1945)
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, also known by his initials, FDR, was the 32nd President of the United States (1933–1945) and a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic crisis and world war.
President of the United States, Roosevelt

Benjamin Harrison

Benjamin Harrison
(August 20, 1833 - March 13, 1901)
Benjamin Harrison was the 23rd President of the United States (1889–1893). Harrison, a grandson of President William Henry Harrison, was born in North Bend, Ohio, and moved to Indianapolis, Indiana at age 21, eventually becoming a prominent politician there. During the American Civil War, he served the Union as a Brigadier General in the XX Corps of the Army of the Cumberland. After the war he unsuccessfully ran for the governorship of Indiana, and was later appointed to the U.S. Senate from that state.
Harrison, President of the United States

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson
(April 13, 1743 - July 4, 1826)
Thomas Jefferson was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence (1776) and the third President of the United States (1801–1809). At the beginning of the American Revolution, Jefferson served in the Continental Congress, representing Virginia.
Jefferson, President of the United States

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
(February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865)
Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. He successfully led his country through a great constitutional, military and moral crisis – the American Civil War – preserving the Union, while ending slavery, and promoting economic and financial modernization. Reared in a poor family on the western frontier, Lincoln was mostly self-educated. He became a country lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a one-term member of the United States House of Representatives, but failed in two attempts to be elected to the United States Senate.
Lincoln, President of the United States

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant
(April 27, 1822 - July 23, 1885)
Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877) following his dominant role in the second half of the Civil War. Under Grant, the Union Army defeated the Confederate military and effectively ended the war with the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army at Appomattox. As President he led the Radical Republicans in their effort to eliminate all vestiges of Confederate nationalism and slavery; he effectively destroyed the Ku Klux Klan in 1871.
Grant, President of the United States
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