This Day In History
This Day In History
Saturday, May 26, 2018

«writer»

Mikhail Lermontov

Mikhail Lermontov
(October 15, 1814 - July 27, 1841)
Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov, a Russian Romantic writer, poet and painter, sometimes called "the poet of the Caucasus", has become the most important Russian poet after Alexander Pushkin's death in 1837. Lermontov is considered the supreme poet of Russian literature side by side with Pushkin and the greatest figure of Russian Romanticism. His influence on later Russian literature is still felt in modern times, not only through his poetry, but also through his prose, which has founded the tradition of Russian psychological novel.
Lermontov, Russian writer, writer

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
(October 16, 1854 - November 30, 1900)
Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was an Irish writer and poet. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. Today he is remembered for his epigrams, plays and the circumstances of his imprisonment, followed by his early death.
writer, poet

Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift
(November 30, 1667 - October 19, 1745)
Jonathan Swift was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.
Swift, writer, satirist

Gianni Rodari

Gianni Rodari
(October 23, 1920 - April 14, 1980)
Gianni Rodari was an Italian writer and journalist, most famous for his books for children. He won the Hans Christian Andersen Award in 1970 and is considered by many to be Italy's most important twentieth-century children's author. His books have been translated into many languages, though few have been published in English.
Italian writer, writer, journalist

Theophile Gautier

Theophile Gautier
(August 30, 1811 - October 23, 1872)
Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, art critic and literary critic. While Gautier was an ardent defender of Romanticism, his work is difficult to classify and remains a point of reference for many subsequent literary traditions such as Parnassianism, Symbolism, Decadence and Modernism. He was widely esteemed by writers as diverse as Balzac, Baudelaire, the Goncourt brothers, Flaubert, Proust and Oscar Wilde.
French writer, writer, poet, dramatist

Bernard Shaw

Bernard Shaw
(July 26, 1856 - November 2, 1950)
George Bernard Shaw was an Irish playwright and a co-founder of the London School of Economics. Although his first profitable writing was music and literary criticism, in which capacity he wrote many highly articulate pieces of journalism, his main talent was for drama, and he wrote more than 60 plays.
Shaw, Irish writer, writer

Maurice Leblanc

Maurice Leblanc
(November 11, 1864 - November 6, 1941)
Maurice Marie Émile Leblanc was a French novelist and writer of short stories, known primarily as the creator of the fictional gentleman thief and detective Arsène Lupin, often described as a French counterpart to Arthur Conan Doyle's creation Sherlock Holmes.
French novelist, novelist, writer

Ivan Bunin

Ivan Bunin
(October 22, 1870 - November 8, 1953)
Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin was the first Russian writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature for the strict artistry with which he carried on the classical Russian traditions in the writing of prose and poetry. The texture of his poems and stories, sometimes referred to as «Bunin brocade», is considered to be one of the richest in the language.
Russian writer, writer

Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson
(November 13, 1850 - December 3, 1894)
Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer. His best-known books include «Treasure Island», «Kidnapped», and «Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde».
Scottish writer, writer, Treasure Island

Jean Paul

Jean Paul
(March 21, 1763 - November 14, 1825)
Jean Paul was a German Romantic writer, best known for his humorous novels and stories.
German writer, writer

Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust
(July 10, 1871 - November 18, 1922)
Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time; earlier translated as Remembrance of Things Past). It was published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927.
French writer, writer, novelist

Lev Tolstoy

Lev Tolstoy
(September 9, 1828 - November 20, 1910)
Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy was a Russian writer who primarily wrote novels and short stories. Later in life, he also wrote plays and essays.
Russian writer, writer

Voltaire

Voltaire
(November 21, 1694 - May 30, 1778)
François-Marie Arouet, better known by the pen name Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit and for his advocacy of civil liberties, including freedom of religion, free trade and separation of church and state.
French philosopher, philosopher, writer

Jack London

Jack London
(January 12, 1876 - November 22, 1916)
John Griffith "Jack" London was an American author, journalist, and social activist.
American writer, writer

Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair
(September 20, 1878 - November 25, 1968)
Upton Beall Sinclair Jr. (September 20, 1878 – November 25, 1968), was an American author who wrote close to 100 books in many genres.
American writer, journalist, politician, writer

Marquis de Sade

Marquis de Sade
(June 2, 1740 - December 2, 1814)
Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat, revolutionary politician, philosopher, and writer famous for his libertine sexuality and lifestyle.
French writer, writer

Joseph Conrad

Joseph Conrad
(December 3, 1857 - August 3, 1924)
Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski) was a Polish-born English novelist.
British writer, writer

Alexandre Dumas

Alexandre Dumas
(July 24, 1802 - December 5, 1870)
Alexandre Dumas was a French writer, best known for his historical novels of high adventure which have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world.
Dumas, French writer, writer

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
(December 11, 1918 - August 3, 2008)
Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn was a Russian novelist, dramatist, and historian. Through his often-suppressed writings, he helped to raise global awareness of the Gulag, the Soviet Union's forced labor camp system – particularly in «The Gulag Archipelago» and «One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich», two of his best-known works.
Solzhenitsyn, Russian writer, writer

Ivan Cankar

Ivan Cankar
(May 10, 1876 - December 11, 1918)
Ivan Cankar was a Slovene writer, playwright, essayist, poet and political activist. Together with Oton Župančič, Dragotin Kette and Josip Murn, he is considered as the beginner of modernism in Slovene literature. He is regarded as the greatest writer in the Slovene language, and has sometimes been compared to Franz Kafka and James Joyce.
Slovene writer, writer

Johann Gottfried Herder

Johann Gottfried Herder
(August 25, 1744 - December 18, 1803)
Johann Gottfried von Herder was a German philosopher, theologian, poet, and literary critic. He is associated with the periods of Enlightenment, Sturm und Drang, and Weimar Classicism.
German writer, writer

Giovanni Boccaccio

Giovanni Boccaccio
(1313-21.12.1375 )
Giovanni Boccaccio was an Italian author and poet, a friend, student, and correspondent of Petrarch, an important Renaissance humanist and the author of a number of notable works including the “Decameron”, “On Famous Women”, and his poetry in the Italian vernacular.
Italian writer, writer

F Scott Fitzgerald

F Scott Fitzgerald
(September 24, 1896 - December 21, 1940)
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was an American author of novels and short stories, whose works are the paradigm writings of the Jazz Age, a term he coined himself. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.
American writer, writer

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray
(July 18, 1811 - December 24, 1863)
William Makepeace Thackeray was an English novelist of the 19th century. He was famous for his satirical works, particularly "Vanity Fair", a panoramic portrait of English society.
British writer, writer

Theodore Dreiser

Theodore Dreiser
(August 27, 1871 - December 28, 1945)
Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser was an American novelist and journalist of the naturalist school. His novels often featured main characters who succeeded at their objectives despite a lack of a firm moral code, and literary situations that more closely resemble studies of nature than tales of choice and agency.
American writer, journalist, writer

Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling
(December 30, 1865 - January 18, 1936)
Joseph Rudyard Kipling was an English poet, short-story writer, and novelist chiefly remembered for his celebration of British imperialism, tales and poems of British soldiers in India, and his tales for children. Kipling received the 1907 Nobel Prize for Literature.
English writer, writer, Nobel laureate

J. D. Salinger

J. D. Salinger
(January 1, 1919 - January 27, 2010)
Jerome David Salinger was an American author, best known for his 1951 novel «The Catcher in the Rye», as well as his reclusive nature. His last original published work was in 1965; he gave his last interview in 1980.
American writer, writer, novelist

Albert Camus

Albert Camus
(November 7, 1913 - January 4, 1960)
Albert Camus was a French author, journalist, and key philosopher of the 20th century. In 1949, Camus founded the Group for International Liaisons within the Revolutionary Union Movement, which was opposed to some tendencies of the Surrealist movement of André Breton.
French writer, writer, Nobel laureate

Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco
(05.01.1932 )
Umberto Eco is an Italian semiotician, essayist, philosopher, literary critic, and novelist, best known for his novel “The Name of the Rose” (“Il nome della rosa”, 1980), an intellectual mystery combining semiotics in fiction, biblical analysis, medieval studies and literary theory.
Italian writer, writer

Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie
(September 15, 1890 - January 12, 1976)
Dame Agatha Christie was a British crime writer of novels, short stories, and plays. She also wrote romances under the name Mary Westmacott, but she is best remembered for her 66 detective novels and 14 short story collections (especially those featuring Hercule Poirot or Miss Jane Marple), and her successful West End plays.
British writer, writer

Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll
(January 27, 1832 - January 14, 1898)
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known by the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are “Alice's Adventures in Wonderland” and its sequel “Through the Looking-Glass”, as well as the poems "The Hunting of the Snark" and "Jabberwocky", all examples of the genre of literary nonsense.
English writer, writer

George Orwell

George Orwell
(June 25, 1903 - January 21, 1950)
Eric Arthur Blair, better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. His work is marked by keen intelligence and wit, a profound awareness of social injustice, an intense opposition to totalitarianism, a passion for clarity in language and a belief in democratic socialism.
English writer, writer

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
(November 11, 1821 - February 9, 1881)
Fyodor Mikhaylovich Dostoyevsky was a Russian writer of novels, short stories and essays. He is best known for his novels Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov.
Russian writer, writer

James Joyce

James Joyce
(February 2, 1882 - January 13, 1941)
James Augustine Aloysius Joyce was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century.
Irish writer, writer

James Hadley Chase

James Hadley Chase
(December 24, 1906 - February 6, 1985)
James Hadley Chase is the best-known pseudonym of the British writer Rene Brabazon Raymond who also wrote under the names James L. Docherty, Ambrose Grant, and Raymond Marshall. Chase is one of the best known thriller writers of all time. The canon of Chase, comprising ninety titles, has earned for him a reputation as the king of thriller writers in Europe. He is also one of the internationally best-selling authors, and 50 of his books have been made into films.
British writer, writer

Carlo Goldoni

Carlo Goldoni
(February 25, 1707 - February 6, 1793)
Carlo Osvaldo Goldoni was an Italian playwright and librettist from the Republic of Venice. His works include some of Italy's most famous and best-loved plays. Audiences have admired the plays of Goldoni for their ingenious mix of wit and honesty.
Italian playwright, playwright, writer

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
(February 7, 1812 - June 9, 1870)
Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English novelist, generally considered the greatest of the Victorian period. Dickens enjoyed a wider popularity and fame than had any previous author during his lifetime, and he remains popular, having been responsible for some of English literature's most iconic novels and characters.
English writer, writer, novelist

Aleksander Griboyedov

Aleksander Griboyedov
(January 15, 1795 - February 11, 1829)
Aleksander Sergeyevich Griboyedov was a Russian diplomat, playwright, poet, and composer. He is recognized as homo unius libri, a writer of one book, whose fame rests on the brilliant verse comedy Woe from Wit (or: The Woes of Wit), still one of the most often staged plays in Russia. He was Russia's ambassador to Qajar Persia, where he was massacred along with the whole embassy by the angry local mob.
Russian writer, writer, diplomat

Georges Simenon

Georges Simenon
(February 13, 1903 - September 4, 1989)
Georges Joseph Christian Simenon was a Belgian writer. A prolific author who published nearly 200 novels and numerous short works, Simenon is best known for the creation of the fictional detective Maigret.
Belgian writer, writer, Maigret

Gotthold Ephraim Lessing

Gotthold Ephraim Lessing
(January 22, 1729 - February 15, 1781)
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing was a German writer, philosopher, dramatist, publicist, and art critic, and one of the most outstanding representatives of the Enlightenment era. His plays and theoretical writings substantially influenced the development of German literature. He is widely considered by theatre historians to be the first dramaturg.
German writer, writer, philosopher, dramatist

American writer, writer, Nobel laureate

American writer, writer, Nobel laureate
(February 27, 1902 - December 20, 1968)
John Steinbeck


Michel de Montaigne

Michel de Montaigne
(February 28, 1533 - September 13, 1592)
Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne was one of the most influential writers of the French Renaissance, known for popularising the essay as a literary genre and is popularly thought of as the father of Modern Skepticism.
French writer, writer

D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence
(September 11, 1885 - March 2, 1930)
David Herbert Richards Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D. H. Lawrence. His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional health and vitality, spontaneity, and instinct.
English writer, writer

Arthur Koestler

Arthur Koestler
(September 5, 1905 - March 3, 1983)
Arthur Koestler was a Hungarian-British author and journalist. Koestler was born in Budapest and, apart from his early school years, was educated in Austria. In 1931 Koestler joined the Communist Party of Germany but, disillusioned by Stalinist atrocities, he resigned in 1938. In 1940 he published his novel Darkness at Noon, an anti-totalitarian work, which gained him international fame.
English writer, writer

Frank Wedekind

Frank Wedekind
(July 24, 1864 - March 9, 1918)
Benjamin Franklin Wedekind, usually known as Frank Wedekind, was a German playwright. His work, which often criticizes bourgeois attitudes (particularly towards sex), is considered to anticipate expressionism, and he was a major influence on the development of epic theatre.
German writer, writer, playwright

Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov
(May 15, 1891 - March 10, 1940)
Mikhail Afanasyevich Bulgakov was a Soviet Russian writer and playwright active in the first half of the 20th century. He is best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which The Times of London has called one of the masterpieces of the 20th century.
Russian writer, writer

Paul Heyse

Paul Heyse
(March 15, 1830 - April 2, 1914)
Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse was a distinguished German writer and translator. A member of two important literary societies, the Tunnel über der Spree in Berlin and Die Krokodile in Munich, he wrote novels, poetry, 177 short stories, and about sixty dramas. The sum of Heyse's many and varied productions made him a dominant figure among German men of letters.
German writer, writer, Nobel laureate

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs
(September 1, 1875 - March 19, 1950)
Edgar Rice Burroughs was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan and the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter, although he produced works in many genres.
American writer, writer, Tarzan

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
(August 28, 1749 - March 22, 1832)
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was a German writer, pictorial artist, biologist, theoretical physicist, and polymath. He is considered the supreme genius of modern German literature. His works span the fields of poetry, drama, prose, philosophy, and science. His Faust has been called the greatest long poem of modern European literature. His other well-known literary works include his numerous poems, the Bildungsroman Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, and the epistolary novel The Sorrows of Young Werther.
Goethe, German writer, writer

August von Kotzebue

August von Kotzebue
(May 3, 1761 - March 23, 1819)
August Friedrich Ferdinand von Kotzebue was a German dramatist and author who also worked as a Generalkonsul in Russia. One of Kotzebue's books was burned during the Wartburg festival in 1817. He was murdered in 1819 by Karl Ludwig Sand, a militant member of the Burschenschaften. The murder of Kotzebue gave Metternich the pretext to issue the Carlsbad Decrees of 1819, which dissolved the Burschenschaften, cracked down on the liberal press, and seriously restricted academic freedom in the states of the German Confederation.
German writer, writer, dramatist

Jules Verne

Jules Verne
(February 8, 1828 - March 24, 1905)
Jules Gabriel Verne was a French author who pioneered the science fiction genre. He is best known for his novels Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870), A Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), and Around the World in Eighty Days (1873). Verne wrote about space, air, and underwater travel before air travel and practical submarines were invented, and before practical means of space travel had been devised. He is the second most translated author in the world (after Agatha Christie). Some of his books have also been made into live-action and animated films and television shows. Verne is often referred to as the "Father of Science Fiction", a title sometimes shared with Hugo Gernsback and H. G. Wells.
Jules Verne, French writer, writer

Frederic Mistral

Frederic Mistral
(September 8, 1830 - March 25, 1914)
Frédéric Mistral was a French writer and lexicographer of the Occitan language. Mistral won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1904 and was a founding member of Félibrige and a member of l'Académie de Marseille. He was born in Maillane in the Bouches-du-Rhône département in southern France.
French writer, writer

Graham Greene

Graham Greene
(October 2, 1904 - April 3, 1991)
Henry Graham Greene was an English author, playwright and literary critic. His works explore the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world. Greene was notable for his ability to combine serious literary acclaim with widespread popularity.
English writer, writer

Thomas Mayne Reid

Thomas Mayne Reid
(April 4, 1818 - October 22, 1883)
Thomas Mayne Reid, was an Irish-American novelist. "Captain" Reid wrote many adventure novels akin to those written by Frederick Marryat and Robert Louis Stevenson. He was a great admirer of Lord Byron. These novels contain action that takes place primarily in untamed settings: the American West, Mexico, South Africa, the Himalayas, and Jamaica.
American writer, writer

Francois Rabelais

Francois Rabelais
(1494-09.04.1553 )
François Rabelais was a major French Renaissance writer, doctor, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar. He has historically been regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, bawdy jokes and songs. His best known work is Gargantua and Pantagruel.
French writer, writer

Evelyn Waugh

Evelyn Waugh
(October 28, 1903 - April 10, 1966)
Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh, known as Evelyn Waugh, was an English writer of novels, travel books and biographies. He was also a prolific journalist and reviewer. His best-known works include his early satires Decline and Fall (1928) and A Handful of Dust (1934), his novel Brideshead Revisited (1945) and his trilogy of Second World War novels collectively known as Sword of Honour (1952–61). Waugh is widely recognised as one of the great prose stylists of the 20th century.
English writer, writer

Alexander Ostrovsky

Alexander Ostrovsky
(April 12, 1823 - June 14, 1886)
Alexander Nikolayevich Ostrovsky was a Russian playwright.
Russian writer, writer

Henry James

Henry James
(April 15, 1843 - February 28, 1916)
Henry James was an American-born writer, regarded as one of the key figures of 19th-century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr., a clergyman, and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
American writer, writer

Anthony Trollope

Anthony Trollope
(April 24, 1815 - December 6, 1882)
Anthony Trollope was one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. Some of his best-loved works, collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, revolve around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote perceptive novels on political, social, and gender issues, and on other topical matters.
English writer, writer

Ludwig Tieck

Ludwig Tieck
(May 31, 1773 - April 28, 1853)
Johann Ludwig Tieck was a German poet, translator, editor, novelist, writer of Novellen, and critic, who was one of the founding fathers of the Romantic movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
German writer, writer

Joseph Addison

Joseph Addison
(May 1, 1672 - June 17, 1719)
Joseph Addison was an English essayist, poet, playwright and politician. He was a man of letters, eldest son of Lancelot Addison. His name is usually remembered alongside that of his long-standing friend, Richard Steele, with whom he founded The Spectator magazine.
English writer, writer

Jerome Klapka Jerome

Jerome Klapka Jerome
(May 2, 1859 - June 14, 1927)
Jerome Klapka Jerome was an English writer and humorist, best known for the humorous travelogue Three Men in a Boat. Jerome was born in Caldmore, Walsall, England, and was brought up in poverty in London. He attended St Marylebone Grammar School. Other works include the essay collections Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow and Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow; Three Men on the Bummel, a sequel to Three Men in a Boat; and several other novels.
English writer, writer

Daphne du Maurier

Daphne du Maurier
(May 13, 1907 - April 19, 1989)
Dame Daphne du Maurier, Lady Browning was a British author and playwright. Many of her works have been adapted into films, including the novels Rebecca (which won the Best Picture Oscar in 1941) and Jamaica Inn and the short stories "The Birds" and "Don't Look Now". The first three were directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Her elder sister was the writer Angela du Maurier. Her father was the actor Gerald du Maurier. Her grandfather was the writer George du Maurier.
British writer, writer

Honore de Balzac

Honore de Balzac
(May 20, 1799 - August 18, 1850)
Honoré de Balzac was a French novelist and playwright. His magnum opus was a sequence of short stories and novels collectively entitled La Comédie humaine, which presents a panorama of French life in the years after the 1815 fall of Napoleon.
French writer, writer

Edmund Wilson

Edmund Wilson
(May 8, 1895 - June 12, 1972)
Edmund Wilson was an American writer, literary and social critic, and noted man of letters.
American writer, writer

James Matthew Barrie

James Matthew Barrie
(May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937)
Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, was a Scottish author and dramatist, best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan. The child of a family of small-town weavers, he was educated in Scotland. He moved to London, where he developed a career as a novelist and playwright.
Scottish writer, writer

Ambrose Bierce

Ambrose Bierce
(June 24, 1842 - December 26, 1913)
Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce was an American editorialist, journalist, short story writer, fabulist, and satirist. Today, he is probably best-known for his short story "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and his satirical lexicon The Devil's Dictionary. His vehemence as a critic, his motto "Nothing matters" and the sardonic view of human nature that informed his work all earned him the nickname "Bitter Bierce".
American writer, writer

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Jean-Jacques Rousseau
(June 28, 1712 - July 2, 1778)
Jean-Jacques Rousseau was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of 18th-century Romanticism of French expression. His political philosophy influenced the French Revolution as well as the overall development of modern political, sociological and educational thought.
Genevan philosopher, philosopher, writer, composer

Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle
(May 22, 1859 - July 7, 1930)
Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle was a Scottish physician and writer, most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, generally considered a milestone in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels.
Scottish writer, writer, Sherlock Holmes

Ann Radcliffe

Ann Radcliffe
(July 9, 1764 - February 7, 1823)
Ann Radcliffe was an English author, and a pioneer of the Gothic novel. Her style is romantic in its vivid descriptions of landscapes, and long travel scenes, yet the Gothic element is obvious through her use of the supernatural. It was her technique of explained Gothicism, the final revelation of inexplicable phenomena, that helped the Gothic novel achieve respectability in the 1790s.
English writer, writer

Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov
(January 29, 1860 - July 15, 1904)
Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was a Russian physician, dramatist and author who is considered to be among the greatest writers of short stories in history. His career as a dramatist produced four classics and his best short stories are held in high esteem by writers and critics. Chekhov practised as a doctor throughout most of his literary career: "Medicine is my lawful wife", he once said, "and literature is my mistress."
Russian writer, writer

Edmond de Goncourt

Edmond de Goncourt
(May 26, 1822 - July 16, 1896)
Edmond de Goncourt, born Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt, was a French writer, literary critic, art critic, book publisher and the founder of the Académie Goncourt.
French writer, writer

Elias Canetti

Elias Canetti
(July 25, 1905 - August 14, 1994)
Elias Canetti was a Bulgarian-born modernist novelist, playwright, memoirist, and non-fiction writer. He wrote in German and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1981, "for writings marked by a broad outlook, a wealth of ideas and artistic power".
Bulgarian writer, writer, Nobel laureate
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