This Day In History

This Day In History

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

On This Day

Events

in 1817

Seal of Mississippi
Seal of Mississippi
Mississippi becomes the 20th U.S. state. Mississippi is a U.S. state located in the Southern United States. Jackson is the state capital and largest city. The name of the state derives from the Mississippi River, which flows along its western boundary, whose name comes from the Ojibwe word misi-ziibi ("Great River"). The state is heavily forested outside of the Mississippi Delta area, which had been cleared for cotton cultivation in the 19th century. Today its catfish aquaculture farms produce the majority of farm-raised catfish consumed in the United States. The state symbol is the magnolia grandiflora tree.
Mississippi, United States

in 1901

The first Nobel Prizes...
The first Nobel Prizes are awarded. The Nobel Prizes are annual international awards bestowed by Scandinavian committees in recognition of cultural and scientific advances. The will of the Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, established the prizes in 1895. The prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace were first awarded in 1901.
Nobel Prizes, Nobel

in 1948

The UN General Assembly adopts the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. The Declaration arose directly from the experience of the Second World War and represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. It consists of 30 articles which have been elaborated in subsequent international treaties, regional human rights instruments, national constitutions and laws. The International Bill of Human Rights consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols. In 1966 the General Assembly adopted the two detailed Covenants, which complete the International Bill of Human Rights; and in 1976, after the Covenants had been ratified by a sufficient number of individual nations, the Bill took on the force of international law.
UDHR, UN

Births

in 1821
Nikolay Nekrasov

Nikolay Alexeyevich Nekrasov was a Russian poet, writer, critic and publisher, whose deeply compassionate poems about peasant Russia won him Fyodor Dostoyevsky's admiration and made him the hero of liberal and radical circles of Russian intelligentsia, as represented by Vissarion Belinsky and Nikolay Chernyshevsky.
in 1830
Emily Dickinson

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life.

Deaths

in 1851
Karl Drais

Karl Drais was a German inventor and invented the Laufmaschine ("running machine"), also later called the velocipede, draisine (English) or "draisienne" (French), also nicknamed the dandy horse. This incorporated the two-wheeler principle that is basic to the bicycle and motorcycle and was the beginning of mechanized personal transport. Drais also invented the earliest typewriter with a keyboard in 1821, later developed into an early stenograph machine, and a wood-saving cooker including the earliest hay chest.
in 1896
Alfred Nobel

Alfred Bernhard Nobel was a Swedish chemist, engineer, innovator, and armaments manufacturer. He is the inventor of dynamite. Nobel also owned Bofors, which he had redirected from its previous role as primarily an iron and steel producer to a major manufacturer of cannon and other armaments.
in 2006
Augusto Pinochet

Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte was a Chilean army general and leader of a military government that assumed power in a coup d'état on 11 September 1973. He was the Commander-in-Chief of the Chilean army from 1973 to 1990, president of the Government Junta of Chile from 1973 to 1974 and President of the Republic from 1974 until transferring power to a democratically elected president in 1990

Why to study History?

Why to study History? It is a very popular question. Really, why should we learn by heart plenty of dates, names of historical personalities and so on? Especially nowadays when we are surrounded by modern technologies, when science makes much progress day after day and the whole those stories from our past seem to be just unpleasant fairy tales.

One of the Russian historians once said: “History doesn’t teach. It punishes for unlearned lessons”. It isn’t a secret that all the being of human society from ancient times to our days looks like a snake biting its own tale. History is cyclical and every event, every person and every mistake took place one day in the past. The thing is that we should use this knowledge as а diligent student uses his draft. There is no sense in doing the same mistakes our ancestors did. For instance, everyone in the world knows what is hidden beyond Victory Day. Blood, tears and millions of deaths. On this day we must remember not only the fallen in battles of the Second World War soldiers, but the reasons and results of that war. Not a very single person feels happier on this day if he isn’t insane. Because everyone understands that wars don’t bring anything besides grief and death. This is a simple idea that should be driven into the heads of persons who dared to give a Nobel Peace Prize to a man bombing other countries “for the love of global happiness”. And if you didn’t sleep at your History lessons you can easy name a dozen of characters of this kind.

Scientists say that we shouldn’t think of History as of something global only. It seems ridiculous but the History of the world is similar to a life of a man. And it helps us to understand ourselves better. The main lesson of History is to remember that we can’t change our past but we can change our future. This day in history, in history of a man, is for sure a repetition of that day in history of his father or grandfather. Characters of science fiction used to wish a book with the description of the events in future. However, we have such a book. It is a book of History. If you look it through from a different point of view you will understand what a treasure you have got. There is no fate and no magic balls. But a book of History for a sensible person can substitute a camp of soothsayers. Just a little bit of logic and tactic to turn an obscurity into a well-planned future.

Studying History is necessary for everybody. It helps politicians to avoid repeating global misdoings, it teaches businessmen to build their companies hanging upon the experience of their forerunners, it inspires people of art who know better than others how fleeting this day in history is. Even scientists being the most advanced people whose lives depend on their view not upon only this day but upon the whole future can’t work without realizing the most primitive and basic knowledge of yore. Because if you don’t know primitives it’s easy to come down to it.

Studying History isn’t just a mechanic learning by rote what has happened on this day in history or that one. It is rethinking of the whole volume of people’s activity. Without this we would stay mammoth hunters who don’t perceive why their lives goes worse and worse.

They say that those who will throw a stone at the past will be shot with a gun by the future. We live in a technical world, we are surrounded by ultramodern devices and history of ancient days seems to be a too far and insignificant thing to worry about. But when “that day in history” turns suddenly into “this day in history” people understand that it was a mistake to escape from our bygone heritage and leave mistakes behind.

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