This Day In History
Saturday, December 15, 2018
On This Day

Events

in 1933

Hugh Gray takes the...
Hugh Gray takes the first known photos of the Loch Ness Monster. The Loch Ness Monster (Scottish Gaelic Niseag) is a cryptid that is reputed to inhabit Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. The most frequent speculation is that the creature represents a line of long-surviving plesiosaurs. It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next.
Loch Ness Monster, Hugh Gray, Nessie

in 1936

San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge
San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge
In California, the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge opens to traffic. The San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge (known locally as the Bay Bridge) is a pair of bridges spanning San Francisco Bay of California, in the United States. Forming part of Interstate 80 and of the direct road route between San Francisco and Oakland, it carries approximately 270,000 vehicles per day on its two decks. It has one of the longest spans in the world.
San Francisco, bridge

in 1944

Tirpitz capsized
Tirpitz capsized
The Royal Air Force launches 29 Avro Lancaster bombers in one of the most successful precision bombing attacks of war and sinks the German battleship Tirpitz , with 12,000 lb Tallboy bombs off Tromsø, Norway. Tirpitz was the second of two Bismarck-class battleships built for the German Kriegsmarine during World War II. Named after Grand Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz, the architect of the Imperial Navy, the ship was laid down at the Kriegsmarinewerft in Wilhelmshaven in November 1936 and launched two and a half years later in April 1939. Work was completed in February 1941, when she was commissioned into the German fleet.
Tirpitz, battleship, Avro Lancaster, World War II

Births

in 1840
Auguste Rodin

François-Auguste-René Rodin was a French sculptor. Although Rodin is generally considered the progenitor of modern sculpture, he did not set out to rebel against the past. He was schooled traditionally, took a craftsman-like approach to his work, and desired academic recognition, although he was never accepted into Paris's foremost school of art.
in 1935
Lyudmila Gurchenko

Lyudmila Markovna Gurchenko was a popular Soviet and Russian actress, singer and entertainer.

Deaths

in 1793
Jean-Sylvain Bailly

Jean-Sylvain Bailly was a French astronomer and orator, one of the leaders of the early part of the French Revolution. He served as the mayor of Paris from 1789 to 1791 and was ultimately guillotined during the Reign of Terror.
in 1916
Percival Lowell

Percival Lawrence Lowell was a businessman, author, mathematician, and astronomer who fueled speculation that there were canals on Mars, founded the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, and formed the beginning of the effort that led to the discovery of Pluto 14 years after his death. The choice of the name Pluto and its symbol were partly influenced by his initials PL.
in 1969
Liu Shaoqi

Liu Shaoqi was a Chinese revolutionary, statesman, and theorist. He was Chairman of the People's Republic of China, China's head of state, from 27 April 1959 to 31 October 1968, during which he implemented policies of economic reconstruction in China.
in 1981
William Holden

William Holden was an American actor. Holden won the Academy Award for Best Actor in 1954 and the Emmy Award for Best Actor in 1974. One of the most popular and well known movie stars of all time, Holden was one of the biggest box office draws of the 1950s, he was named one of the "Top 10 Stars of the Year" six times (1954–1958, 1961) and appeared on the American Film Institute's AFI's 100 Years…100 Stars list as number 25. He starred in some of the most popular and critically acclaimed films of all time, including such blockbusters as Sunset Boulevard, The Bridge on the River Kwai, The Wild Bunch, The Towering Inferno, and Network.
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