This Day In History
This Day In History
Sunday, December 16, 2018

«German physicist»

Gustav Kirchhoff

Gustav Kirchhoff
(March 12, 1824 - October 17, 1887)
Gustav Robert Kirchhoff was a German physicist who contributed to the fundamental understanding of electrical circuits, spectroscopy, and the emission of black-body radiation by heated objects.
German physicist, physicist

Lise Meitner

Lise Meitner
(November 7, 1878 - October 27, 1968)
Lise Meitner was an Austrian-born, later Swedish, physicist who worked on radioactivity and nuclear physics. Meitner was part of the team that discovered nuclear fission, an achievement for which her colleague Otto Hahn was awarded the Nobel Prize. Meitner is often mentioned as one of the most glaring examples of women's scientific achievement overlooked by the Nobel committee. A 1997 Physics Today study concluded that Meitner's omission was "a rare instance in which personal negative opinions apparently led to the exclusion of a deserving scientist" from the Nobel. Element 109, Meitnerium, is named in her honor.
German physicist, physicist

Max Abraham

Max Abraham
(March 26, 1875 - November 16, 1922)
Max Abraham was a German physicist. Abraham was born in Danzig, Imperial Germany to a family of Jewish merchants. His father was Moritz Abraham and his mother was Selma Moritzsohn. Attending the University of Berlin, he studied under Max Planck. He graduated in 1897. For the next three years, Abraham worked as Planck's assistant.
German physicist, physicist

Wolfgang Paul

Wolfgang Paul
(August 10, 1913 - December 7, 1993)
Wolfgang Paul was a German physicist, who co-developed the non-magnetic quadrupole mass filter which laid the foundation for what we now call an ion trap. He shared one-half of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1989 for this work with Hans Georg Dehmelt; the other half of the Prize in that year was awarded to Norman Foster Ramsey.
German physicist, physicist

Heinrich Hertz

Heinrich Hertz
(February 22, 1857 - January 1, 1894)
Heinrich Rudolf Hertz was a German physicist who clarified and expanded the electromagnetic theory of light that had been put forth by Maxwell. He was the first to satisfactorily demonstrate the existence of electromagnetic waves by building an apparatus to produce and detect radio waves.
German physicist, physicist

Wilhelm Rontgen

Wilhelm Rontgen
(March 27, 1845 - February 10, 1923)
Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen was a German physicist, who, on 8 November 1895, produced and detected electromagnetic radiation in a wavelength range today known as X-rays or Röntgen rays, an achievement that earned him the first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901
German physicist, physicist, Nobel laureate, Rontgen, X-rays

Wilhelm Wien

Wilhelm Wien
(January 13, 1864 - August 30, 1928)
Wilhelm Carl Werner Otto Fritz Franz Wien was a German physicist who, in 1893, used theories about heat and electromagnetism to deduce Wien's displacement law, which calculates the emission of a blackbody at any temperature from the emission at any one reference temperature.
German physicist, physicist, Nobel laureate

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein
(March 14, 1879 - April 18, 1955)
Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of general relativity, effecting a revolution in physics. For this achievement, Einstein is often regarded as the father of modern physics and one of the most prolific intellects in human history. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect". The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory within physics.
Einstein, German physicist, physicist, Nobel laureate

Georg Ohm

Georg Ohm
(March 16, 1789 - July 6, 1854)
Georg Simon Ohm was a German physicist. As a high school teacher, Ohm began his research with the recently invented electrochemical cell, invented by Italian Count Alessandro Volta. Using equipment of his own creation, Ohm determined that there is a direct proportionality between the potential difference (voltage) applied across a conductor and the resultant electric current. This relationship is known as Ohm's law.
Ohm, German physicist, physicist

Max von Laue

Max von Laue
(October 9, 1879 - April 24, 1960)
Max Theodor Felix von Laue was a German physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1914 for his discovery of the diffraction of X-rays by crystals. In addition to his scientific endeavors with contributions in optics, crystallography, quantum theory, superconductivity, and the theory of relativity, he had a number of administrative positions which advanced and guided German scientific research and development during four decades. A strong objector to National Socialism, he was instrumental in re-establishing and organizing German science after World War II.
German physicist, physicist, Nobel laureate
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