This Day In History
This Day In History
Tuesday, December 18, 2018

«Russian writer»

Mikhail Lermontov

Mikhail Lermontov
(October 15, 1814 - July 27, 1841)
Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov, a Russian Romantic writer, poet and painter, sometimes called "the poet of the Caucasus", has become the most important Russian poet after Alexander Pushkin's death in 1837. Lermontov is considered the supreme poet of Russian literature side by side with Pushkin and the greatest figure of Russian Romanticism. His influence on later Russian literature is still felt in modern times, not only through his poetry, but also through his prose, which has founded the tradition of Russian psychological novel.
Lermontov, Russian writer, writer

Ivan Bunin

Ivan Bunin
(October 22, 1870 - November 8, 1953)
Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin was the first Russian writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature for the strict artistry with which he carried on the classical Russian traditions in the writing of prose and poetry. The texture of his poems and stories, sometimes referred to as «Bunin brocade», is considered to be one of the richest in the language.
Russian writer, writer

Lev Tolstoy

Lev Tolstoy
(September 9, 1828 - November 20, 1910)
Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy was a Russian writer who primarily wrote novels and short stories. Later in life, he also wrote plays and essays.
Russian writer, writer

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
(December 11, 1918 - August 3, 2008)
Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn was a Russian novelist, dramatist, and historian. Through his often-suppressed writings, he helped to raise global awareness of the Gulag, the Soviet Union's forced labor camp system – particularly in «The Gulag Archipelago» and «One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich», two of his best-known works.
Solzhenitsyn, Russian writer, writer

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
(November 11, 1821 - February 9, 1881)
Fyodor Mikhaylovich Dostoyevsky was a Russian writer of novels, short stories and essays. He is best known for his novels Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov.
Russian writer, writer

Aleksander Griboyedov

Aleksander Griboyedov
(January 15, 1795 - February 11, 1829)
Aleksander Sergeyevich Griboyedov was a Russian diplomat, playwright, poet, and composer. He is recognized as homo unius libri, a writer of one book, whose fame rests on the brilliant verse comedy Woe from Wit (or: The Woes of Wit), still one of the most often staged plays in Russia. He was Russia's ambassador to Qajar Persia, where he was massacred along with the whole embassy by the angry local mob.
Russian writer, writer, diplomat

Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov
(May 15, 1891 - March 10, 1940)
Mikhail Afanasyevich Bulgakov was a Soviet Russian writer and playwright active in the first half of the 20th century. He is best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which The Times of London has called one of the masterpieces of the 20th century.
Russian writer, writer

Alexander Ostrovsky

Alexander Ostrovsky
(April 12, 1823 - June 14, 1886)
Alexander Nikolayevich Ostrovsky was a Russian playwright.
Russian writer, writer

Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov
(January 29, 1860 - July 15, 1904)
Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was a Russian physician, dramatist and author who is considered to be among the greatest writers of short stories in history. His career as a dramatist produced four classics and his best short stories are held in high esteem by writers and critics. Chekhov practised as a doctor throughout most of his literary career: "Medicine is my lawful wife", he once said, "and literature is my mistress."
Russian writer, writer
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