This Day In History
Saturday, December 15, 2018
On This Day

1839

Events

January 6, 1839

The most damaging storm in 300 years sweeps across Ireland, damaging or destroying more than 20% of the houses in Dublin. The Night of the Big Wind was a severe European windstorm which swept without warning across Ireland on the night of January 6 - January 7, 1839, causing severe damage to property and several hundred deaths; 20% to 25% of houses in north Dublin were damaged or destroyed, and 42 ships were wrecked. The storm attained a very low barometric pressure of 918 hectopascals (27.1 inHg) and tracked eastwards to the north of Ireland, bringing winds gusts of over 100 knots (185 km/h, 115 mph) to the south of the island. At the time, it was the most damaging Irish storm for 300 years.
storm, Ireland, Dublin

November 27, 1839

In Boston, Massachusetts, the American Statistical Association is founded. The American Statistical Association (ASA), is the main professional US organization for statisticians and related professions. It was founded in Boston and is the second oldest, continuously operating professional society in the United States. The ASA services statisticians, quantitative scientists, and users of statistics across many academic areas and applications.
ASA, Boston, Massachusetts

Births

January 19, 1839
Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne can be said to form the bridge between late 19th century Impressionism and the early 20th century's new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism. The line attributed to both Matisse and Picasso that Cézanne "is the father of us all" cannot be easily dismissed.
April 12, 1839
Nikolai Przhevalsky

Nikolai Mikhaylovich Przhevalsky, was a Russian geographer of Polish background and explorer of Central and Eastern Asia. Although he never reached his final goal, Lhasa in Tibet, he travelled through regions unknown to the west, such as northern Tibet, modern Qinghai and Dzungaria. He significantly contributed to European knowledge on Central Asia and was the first known European to describe the only extant species of wild horse, which is named after him.
October 30, 1839
Alfred Sisley

Alfred Sisley was an Impressionist landscape painter who was born and spent most of his life in France, but retained British citizenship. He was the most consistent of the Impressionists in his dedication to painting landscape en plein air (i.e., outdoors). He never deviated into figure painting and, unlike Renoir and Pissarro, never found that Impressionism did not fulfill his artistic needs.

Deaths

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