This Day In History
Tuesday, December 18, 2018
On This Day

1936

Events

February 4, 1936

Radium becomes the first radioactive element to be made synthetically. On 4 February 1936, radium E (bismuth-210) became the first radioactive element to be made synthetically in the United States. Dr. John Jacob Livingood, at the radiation lab at University of California, Berkeley, was bombarding several elements with 5-MEV deuterons. He noted that irradiated bismuth emits fast electrons with a 5-day half-life, which matched the behavior of radium E.
Radium, radioactive

April 18, 1936

The first Champions Day is celebrated in Detroit, Michigan. Champions Day is a special day that was set aside in 1936 to commemorate a number of sporting victories and accomplishments by Detroit, Michigan natives and teams in the early 1930s. April 18 was designated Champions Day in Michigan by the state Governor Frank Fitzgerald, and then specifically for Detroit by the Detroit City Council. The first Champions Day was celebrated with a large party at the Detroit Masonic Temple, an event sponcered by the (now defunct) Detroit Times newspaper. Over 600 fans attended the paid event.
Champions Day, Detroit, Michigan

June 10, 1936

Nu, pogodi! by Soyuzmultfilm
Nu, pogodi! by Soyuzmultfilm
The Russian animation studio Soyuzmultfilm is founded. Soyuzmultfilm is a Russian animation studio based in Moscow. Over the years it has gained international attention and respect, garnering numerous awards both at home and abroad. Noted for a great variety of style, it is regarded as the most influential animation studio of the former Soviet Union. The studio has produced 1530 films during its existence.
Soyuzmultfilm, animation studio, animation

June 26, 1936

Initial flight of the...
Initial flight of the Focke-Wulf Fw 61, the first practical helicopter. The Focke-Wulf Fw 61 is often considered the first practical, functional helicopter, first flown in 1936. It was also known as the Fa 61, as Focke began a new company—Focke Achgelis—after development had begun.
Focke-Wulf Fw 61, first flight, helicopter

November 12, 1936

San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge
San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge
In California, the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge opens to traffic. The San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge (known locally as the Bay Bridge) is a pair of bridges spanning San Francisco Bay of California, in the United States. Forming part of Interstate 80 and of the direct road route between San Francisco and Oakland, it carries approximately 270,000 vehicles per day on its two decks. It has one of the longest spans in the world.
San Francisco, bridge

Births

April 23, 1936
Roy Orbison

Roy Kelton Orbison was an American singer-songwriter, well known for his distinctive, powerful voice, complex compositions, and dark emotional ballads.
May 14, 1936
Bobby Darin

Bobby Darin (born Walden Robert Cassotto) was an American singer who performed in a range of music genres, including pop, rock, jazz, folk and country.
May 17, 1936
Dennis Hopper

Dennis Lee Hopper was an American actor, filmmaker and artist. As a young man, Hopper became interested in acting and eventually became a student of the Actors' Studio. He made his first television appearance in 1954 and appeared in two films featuring James Dean, Rebel Without a Cause (1955) and Giant (1956). During the next 10 years, Hopper appeared frequently on television in guest roles, and by the end of the 1960s had played supporting roles in several films.
August 1, 1936
Yves Saint Laurent

Yves Henri Donat Mathieu-Saint-Laurent, known as Yves Saint Laurent, was a French fashion designer, one of the greatest names in fashion history. In 1985, Caroline Rennolds Milbank wrote, "The most consistently celebrated and influential designer of the past twenty-five years, Yves Saint Laurent can be credited with both spurring the couture's rise from its sixties ashes and with finally rendering ready-to-wear reputable."
August 21, 1936
Wilt Chamberlain

Wilton Norman "Wilt" Chamberlain was an American professional NBA basketball player for the Philadelphia/San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; he also played for the Harlem Globetrotters prior to playing in the NBA. The 7 foot 1 inch Chamberlain weighed 250 pounds as a rookie before bulking up to 275 pounds and eventually over 300 pounds with the Lakers. He played the center position and is considered by his contemporaries as one of the greatest and most dominant players in the history of the NBA.

Deaths

January 18, 1936
Rudyard Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling was an English poet, short-story writer, and novelist chiefly remembered for his celebration of British imperialism, tales and poems of British soldiers in India, and his tales for children. Kipling received the 1907 Nobel Prize for Literature.
February 27, 1936
Ivan Pavlov

Ivan Petrovich Pavlov was a famous Russian psychologist and physiologist. Inspired when the progressive ideas which D. I. Pisarev, the most eminent of the Russian literary critics of the 1860s and I. M. Sechenov, the father of Russian physiology, were spreading, Pavlov abandoned his religious career and decided to devote his life to science.
March 21, 1936
Alexander Glazunov

Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov was a Russian composer of the late Russian Romantic period, music teacher and conductor. He served as director of the Saint Petersburg Conservatory between 1905 and 1928 and was also instrumental in the reorganization of the institute into the Petrograd Conservatory, then the Leningrad Conservatory, following the Bolshevik Revolution. He continued heading the Conservatory until 1930, though he had left the Soviet Union in 1928 and did not return. The best known student under his tenure during the early Soviet years was Dmitri Shostakovich.
May 12, 1936
Louis Camille Maillard

Louis Camille Maillard was a French physician and chemist.
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